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COORDINATIONS

INVITATIONS

REVIEWS: UNDER REVIEWS

Curated
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Post Img August 30th , 2018 at 3:56pm

Flavors of Meaning

Equal Collaboration
Tannya Forcone, Glennon Sweeney

Principled civic engagement approaches enable individual’s lived experiences and the context of those experiences to be captured as part of the research process, providing the added component of ethnographic data that expands understanding and provides a more holistic perspective of complex issues, such as food insecurity. Principled civic engagement approaches allow the voices of individuals and communities create pathways of communication that become vectors of change.


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Post Img August 27th , 2018 at 12:49pm

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Equal Collaboration
Kurt Test

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REVIEWS: COMPLETED

Curated
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Post Img August 20th , 2019 at 12:30pm

Video Transcript: Four Style Criteria

PPJ Editors

A transcript of the fourth installment of the PPJ's Learning Network Video Series, which discusses the four style criteria used to develop content for the journal during Formative Peer Review.


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Post Img June 3rd , 2019 at 2:08pm

PPJ 2.1 Proof 3

PPJ Editors

Abstract concepts such as Islamophobia invite operational definitions that prescribe courses of inquiry that eschew the abstract in favor of the concrete. Ideally, such inquiry renders a concept more intelligible by providing conceptual clarity and by prescribing a research agenda. In our view, inquiries regarding Islamophobia should confront 1) how Muslims are identified, or misidentified, 2) whether Islamophobia is a phobia, prejudice, or both, and 3) how Islamophobia must be narrated.


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Post Img June 3rd , 2019 at 2:06pm

PPJ 2.1 Proof 2

PPJ Editors

Initiatives, such as Open Access, citizen science, and publicly-engaged scholarship, are changing the nature of academic life, pushing university faculty to reconsider their relationship to the community(ies) within which they live and work. But in the conversation about public scholarship, who represents the voice of the public? Are those outside of the university satisfied with how higher education institutions engage their communities? Do they feel they can access and contribute to the knowledge produced at universities? And how do their expectations about university-community collaboration align with those of faculty members? We explore these questions and others through two surveys—one directed at faculty, one at members of the public—to better understand how these distinct groups view the changing role of the university in public life. We find evidence that members of both university faculty and the public support the idea of university-community collaboration in theory—with both groups acknowledging numerous potential benefits for society and for academia—but struggle when putting it into practice. We conclude by discussing some of the potential barriers that prevent successful community-university engagement.


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Post Img June 3rd , 2019 at 2:04pm

PPJ 2.1 Proof 1

PPJ Editors

We argue that philosophers are competent to facilitate public discussion concerning some of the morally significant aspects of current restrictions on human migration across political borders. We demonstrate how presenting the case for open borders can elevate public dialogue on border politics while elucidating important aspects of philosophical reasoning. We share our teaching approach and resources for those keen to re-examine their views on migration alongside their students and within their communities.


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Post Img February 1st , 2019 at 11:02am

PPJ 1.2 Proof 4

PPJ Editors

Principled and engaged scholarship must develop not only prepositional knowledge, but also personal and procedural knowledge that can transform policy solutions to the most pressing challenges facing our food systems. We begin by discussing the meaning of food and engagement in the context of understanding complex lived experiences of food environments. We then discuss the significance of engagement in informing transformative policy solutions. Finally, we discuss the value of employing principled civic engagement practices to collaborate with communities to co-create transformative change.


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Post Img February 1st , 2019 at 10:55am

PPJ 1.2 Proof 1

PPJ Editors

Cultivating a new ethics of food requires the inclusion of diverse voices from well beyond the circle of professional philosophers and ethicists. Further, it requires engaging in reciprocal dialogue with members of the communities for whom these food/ethical issues are living concerns. In other words, a new food ethics must work for everyone, not just professional ethicists.


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Post Img January 29th , 2019 at 2:13pm

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Equal Collaboration
Kurt Test

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Curated
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Post Img October 10th , 2018 at 9:46am

The New Ethics of Food

Equal Collaboration
Zachary Piso, Gretel Van Wieren

This special issue engages the vexing ethical questions raised by issues involved with global food systems (from production to consumption to distribution to waste), which have been intensified by climate change, expanded global interdependence, and shifts in the urban/rural interface for food systems. Prevailing ethical prescriptions and theories of justice, which tend to originate from narrow disciplinary discourses, too rarely feature the voices of those who actually experience the injustices of environmental degradation, food scarcity, and globalized supply chains. Thus, this special issue attempts to meet these challenges by cultivating a new ethics of food that includes diverse voices from well beyond the circle of professional philosophers and ethicists.


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Post Img June 3rd , 2018 at 12:14pm

Scaling the Ivory Tower: Encouraging Dialogue between the Public and Universities

Equal Collaboration
Claire Skea

This piece discusses the potential for genuine dialogue between universities and the public, drawing on the philosophy of Martin Buber and a short film by Czech director, Jan Svankmajer.


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